Thoughts and Prayers: A Christian’s Responsibility

Anytime there is a tragic event, people will say, “my thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.”

When someone experiences a personal tragedy or loss, people will say, “my thoughts and prayers are with you.”

I am not sure what the power of “thoughts” is.  Though, most peoples intention with that word is that they’re thinking positive thoughts towards a person or multiple peoples well being.  I am certain that positive thoughts can’t hurt, and in many ways, sending positive thoughts is a version of an informal prayer. Now, as a Christian, I believer strongly in the power of prayer; however, there is a big problem with sending thoughts and prayers.”

The big problem with telling someone you will be praying for them is that a bunch of you don’t actually end up praying for them!  Make no mistake, when you tell someone you will pray for the and then do not pray for them, that is something you’ll have to account for on judgement day.  It is sinful.  It is a massive character flaw.  You are called upon to pray for those in need. You see, praying for those in need is not just something nice to do, it is your responsibility as a Christian to do so.

When you tell someone you will pray for them, when you tell them that you’re sending your thoughts and prayers, you must actually follow through and pray for them.

When I tell someone I will pray for them, if they are physically with me or on the phone, I will pray with them right in that moment.  If I am not physically with the person, I will stop what I am doing and immediately pray for them.  What is more important than lifting up a person in need to God in prayer?

Prayer is powerful, but the trick is, you have to actually pray!  By all means, give others the comfort of letting them know that they are in your thoughts and prayers, but above all, make sure you follow through and do lift them up in your prayers.

–  KP Kelly

 

Romans 12:12

“Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer.”

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